From the Archives: 1928 dedication of Los Angeles City Hall

The 32-story, 454-foot-tall Los Angeles City Hall opened with a three-day public celebration April 26-28, 1928. Construction started in 1926. Sand for the concrete used came from each of California’s 58 counties. Water came from the 21 historical missions.

A page one story in the April 27, 1928, Los Angeles Times reported:

Where 147 years ago the sandaled padres and the booted dons trod deserted plains, yesterday a city of upward of 1,500,000 people gathered to dedicate the new Los Angeles City Hall, a sheer tower of white symbolizing a new era of progress and accomplishment for the Pacific Southwest. The $9,000,000 public building, the largest in the West and one of the most distinctive in the world, was accepted on behalf of the people of Los Angeles by Mayor Cryer yesterday as the high point of ceremonies, magnificent in the panoply of peace.

Last night, just at dusk, the Lindbergh beacon, a monument to the noted aviator, slashed its beam of light across the sky, its impulse coming from a golden key touched in Washington by President Coolidge. Then the unique and beautiful lighting system of the building was turned on and the tower sprang out of darkness in all its glory of variegated lights, a landmark for miles around. The beacon itself is visible for sixty miles. …

The dedicatory parade, in four divisions and comprising more than 32,000 persons with thirty-four bands, started promptly at 10 a.m. and such was the length of the procession that its march was not completed until 1 p.m. …

Other activities on April 26 included band concerts, speeches, a U.S. Army Aero Squadron encircling the Lindbergh beacon and at 7:30 p.m., opening of doors to the public.

On April 27, 1928, City Hall held an open house for the public. On April 28, another historical parade and flag pageant occurred.

This post was originally published on Sept. 19, 2014.

April 26, 1928: Parade on Spring St. during dedication of the new Los Angeles City Hall. April 26, 1928: Parade on Spring Street for the dedication of the new Los Angeles City Hall. Los Angeles Times April 26, 1928: A giant cake in the shape of new Los Angeles City Hall was entered by Chinese reside April 26, 1928: A giant cake in the shape of the new Los Angeles City Hall was entered by Chinese residents in the city hall dedication parade. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 26, 1928: Parade dedicating the new Los Angeles City Hall on Broadway from the Los Angeles Tim April 26, 1928: Parade dedicating the new Los Angeles City Hall on Broadway. George Watson / Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA

The above photo was taken from the third Los Angeles Times building at First and Broadway. Sign saying “Manufacturers Exhibit” is on the Chamber of Commerce building. Beyond it is the old Los Angeles City Hall. The parade turned to the left on First Street, then proceeded to the new City Hall on Spring Street.

April 26, 1928: Anaheim is represented by an Aladdin lamp float in the Los Angeles City Hall Dedicat April 26, 1928: Anaheim is represented by an Aladdin lamp float in the Los Angeles City Hall dedication parade. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 26, 1928: Los Angeles Fire Department float featuring a replica of the city hall during dedica April 26, 1928: Los Angeles Fire Department float featuring a replica of City Hall during dedication parade. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 26, 1928: Stage and crowd at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. In the left backgrou April 26, 1928: Stage and crowd at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. In the left background is the corner of First and Main. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 26, 1928: Irving Berlin sings at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. This image is fr April 26, 1928: Irving Berlin sings at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 26, 1928: Crowd at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. The program was on the South T April 26, 1928: Crowd at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. The program was on the South Terrace of City Hall. The buildings in background are on Spring Street. News cameras are on left. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 26, 1928: Mayor George E. Cryer gives a speech at dedication ceremonies for the new Los Angele April 26, 1928: Mayor George E. Cryer gives a speech at dedication ceremonies for the new Los Angeles City Hall. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 26, 1928: Crowd at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. Program was held on South Terr April 26, 1928: Crowd at Los Angeles City Hall dedication ceremonies. Main Street is in the background. Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA

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From the Archives: Scorpions’ feat: Fans stay on their feet

The energetic Scorpions kept their fans on their feet for the entire April 24, 1984, concert at the Forum. Two days later, writer Terry Atkinson explained in the Los Angeles Times:

Rock ‘n roll fans will stand for just about anything–literally.

Sometimes they get so caught up in the energy and excitement of a concert that they’ll stay on their feet for four or five songs–despite attempts by ushers and security guards to get everyone seated.

Sooner or later, however, even the most enthusiastic audience tires of standing during a concert. The first slightly slow song is a sure bet to send the fans down in waves. Rarely does a crowd at the Forum stay up for a whole show.

But it happened Tuesday night, when the Scorpions played the first of two consecutive evenings at the Inglewood area (they also headline the San Diego Sports Arena tonight and the Pacific Amphitheatre Saturday).

Except in the far upper reaches, so distant from the stage that the people may have thought the band was the Lakers, the capacity crowd stood through the entire two-hour set, including two encores.

Caption: Guitarist Rudolf Schenker and singer Klaus Meine, founding members of the Scorpions, draw Forum crowd into their hard rock. April 24, 1984: Guitarist Rudolf Schenker and singer Klaus Meine, founding members of the Scorpions, draw Forum crowd into their hard rock. Tony Barnard / Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA

What is it about this German heavy-metal band that earns this response?

Respect for the group’s longevity? After all, this quintet has been plowing the hard-rock field for almost 15 years, reaping its first U.S. top 10 album, “Blackout,” only two years ago.

That may be a factor, but a more likely reason is that the Scorpions are the rare commodity: a rock group that actually improved after being around for more than a decade…

The Scorpions not only got a huge, fat metal sound at the Forum, they proved to be superior showmen, constantly drawing the crowd into the intensity of the performance. The band’s own enthusiasm for the current state of its lively music was hard to resist…

This post was originally published on May 6, 2014.

April 24, 1984: The Scorpions' bass player Francis Buchholz during concert at the Forum. This image April 24, 1984: The Scorpions’ bass player Francis Buchholz during concert at the Forum. Tony Barnard / Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA April 25, 1984: The Scorpions in concert at the Forum in Inglewood. This photo is from the Los Angel April 25, 1984: The Scorpions in concert at the Forum in Inglewood. Tony Barnard / Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA

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From the Archives: Sparkling night on Broadway in L.A.

Following a rain shower, staff photographer Jack Carrick took this image of Broadway in downtown Los Angeles. In the next morning’s Los Angeles Times, the photo’s accompanying headline and caption reported:

A Little Drizzle Puts a Quick Shine on Los Angeles’ Broadway

CLEAN AS A WHISTLE – Sparking lights against clean, dark surfaces make a radiant picture of nighttime Los Angeles. This is Broadway, looking north from 7th St.

This post was originally published on Jan. 16, 2015.

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290 killed in Easter Sunday explosions in Sri Lanka. Americans are among the dead

During that conflict, the so-called Tamil Tiger rebels became ruthless pioneers of suicide bombing, massacring security forces and civilians at police stations, bus stations, jungle camps, banks and mosques. The Tigers, banned as a terrorist organization by dozens of countries including the U.S., were a secular group whose members were mainly Hindu.

Pope faces a grim Easter Sunday after bloodshed in Sri Lanka and the burning of Notre Dame

This year the Easter season has been marred both by the destruction of Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral by fire last week and the massacre on Sunday in Sri Lanka. More than 130 people were killed and hundreds wounded following near-simultaneous blasts at three Sri Lankan churches during Easter Sunday services and three hotels frequented by foreigners.

Feedback: Readers react to ‘Game of Thrones,’ Coachella and more

T Bone Burnett has been a man behind the scenes for many years, however, his views on music, politics, human behavior and life [“Like a Score Seeking a Film,” April 7, by Randy Lewis] are on the same page as mine, and without a doubt the same as a large portion of the American citizenship. I am very empowered by the fact that at least he is “optimistic,” and has so much faith that humans can make the right choice. The complete lack of humanity in our politics now is not America.

From the Archives: Western Air Lines celebrates its 20th anniversary

To celebrate its 20 anniversary, Western Air Lines gathered several aircraft at Lockheed Air Terminal. Serving as a backdrop to the cake-cutting was a Douglas M-2 biplane, a Douglas C-54 Skymaster and a Douglas C-74.

A story in the April 18, 1946, Los Angeles Times reported:

Three planes told the story of transport aviation yesterday at Lockheed Air Terminal where Western Air Lines celebrated its 20th birthday — the beginning of its third decade — as the oldest air carrier in the nation.

Representing the past was Western’s historic M-2 biplane, with criss-crossed wires, fabric fuselage and external control cables, a 100-m.p.h. two-place “speedster” that in 1926 inaugurated W.A.L.’s original mail service from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City.

For the present was the airline’s 54-passenger Spymaster, a sleek, 36-ton luxury liner recently placed in operation on Western’s newest route linking Los Angeles and Denver.

And in the future was the giant Douglas C-74, a bug-eyed monster weighing some 80 tons and destined to carry nearly 100 passengers nonstop over transcontinental ranges.

The two decades of commercial flight were spanned not only by the planes, but by the men who began herding the rickety little M-2’s over the mountains to Salt Lake City without radio or weather reports.

Both history-makers — Fred Kelly, now chief pilot for the airline, and C. N. (Jimmy) James, vice-president in charge of operations — addressed a group of 300 state and civic leaders and guests at the anniversary celebration and helped Teresa Wright, film actress, cut the huge birthday cake. …

The photo above appeared in the April 18, 1946, Los Angeles Times. The Lockheed Air Terminal is now Hollywood Burbank Airport (formerly Bob Hope Airport).

In 1941, Western Air Express changed its name to Western Air Lines. Later the name was shortened to Western Airlines. In 1987, Western Airlines merged with Delta Air Lines.

This post was originally published on Jan. 24, 2017.

April 16, 1940: A Douglas M-2, first plane used by Western Air Express, and a Douglas DC-3, at Union April 16, 1940: A Douglas M-2, first plane used by Western Air Express, and a Douglas DC-3, at Union Air Terminal for the airlines 14th anniversary celebration. Los Angeles Times

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Dodgers’ Joc Pederson spoils Yasiel Puig’s return with walk-off home run

The clash with Kershaw began when Puig ripped the first pitch, an 88-mph slider, down the left-field line just foul. He waved at the second pitch, a looping curveball, to fall behind 0-2. He then took a ball high before Kershaw went back to his slider. The pitch lacked depth — a problem that hampered Kershaw last season — and didn’t fool Puig. He swatted at it with authority and held an arm up as he approached first base. He looked back at the Reds’ dugout when he rounded the bag. The crowd was left stunned, and the Reds had a 2-0 lead.

The political tug of war over releasing tax returns has roots in California

Not that Trump’s tax returns shouldn’t be examined. They should be. Just not by every rummaging Tom, Dick and Harry looking at stuff that’s none of their business, like charitable donations. The returns should be studied in private by a congressional oversight committee. And if suspect, they should be investigated, perhaps in public hearings.